IP Access List Entry Sequence Numbering

Benefits
The ability to apply sequence numbers to IP access list entries simplifies access list changes. Prior to the IP Access List Entry Sequence Numbering feature, there was no way to specify the position of an entry within an access list. If a user wanted to insert an entry (statement) in the middle of an existing list, all of the entries after the desired position had to be removed, then the new entry was added, and then all the removed entries had to be reentered. This method was cumbersome and error prone.

This feature allows users to add sequence numbers to access list entries and resequence them. When a user adds a new entry, the user chooses the sequence number so that it is in a desired position in the access list. If necessary, entries currently in the access list can be resequenced to create room to insert the new entry.

Sequence Numbering Behavior




  • For backward compatibility with previous releases, if entries with no sequence numbers are applied, the first entry is assigned a sequence number of 10, and successive entries are incremented by 10. The maximum sequence number is 2147483647. If the generated sequence number exceeds this maximum number, the following message is displayed:

Exceeded maximum sequence number.

  • If the user enters an entry without a sequence number, it is assigned a sequence number that is 10 greater than the last sequence number in that access list and is placed at the end of the list.
  • If the user enters an entry that matches an already existing entry (except for the sequence number), then no changes are made.
  • If the user enters a sequence number that is already present, the following error message is generated:

Duplicate sequence number.

  • If a new access list is entered from global configuration mode, then sequence numbers for that access list are generated automatically.
  • Distributed support is provided so that the sequence numbers of entries in the Route Processor (RP) and line card (LC) are in synchronization at all times.
  • Sequence numbers are not nvgened. That is, the sequence numbers themselves are not saved. In the event that the system is reloaded, the configured sequence numbers revert to the default sequence starting number and increment. The function is provided for backward compatibility with software releases that do not support sequence numbering.
  • This feature works with named standard and extended IP access lists. Because the name of an access list can be designated as a number, numbers are acceptable.


How to Use Sequence Numbers in an IP Access List

Sequencing Access-List Entries and Revising the Access List
This task shows how to assign sequence numbers to entries in a named IP access list and how to add or delete an entry to or from an access list. It is assumed a user wants to revise an access list. The context of this task is the following:


  • A user need not resequence access lists for no reason; resequencing in general is optional. The resequencing step in this task is shown as required because that is one purpose of this feature and this task demonstrates the feature.
  • Step 5 happens to be a permit statement and Step 6 happens to be a deny statement, but they need not be in that order.


SUMMARY STEPS
1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. ip access-list resequence access-list-name starting-sequence-number increment

4. ip access-list {standard extended} access-list-name

5. sequence-number permit source source-wildcard

or

sequence-number permit protocol source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard [precedence precedence] [tos tos] [log] [time-range time-range-name] [fragments]

6. sequence-number deny source source-wildcard

or

sequence-number deny protocol source source-wildcard destination destination-wildcard [precedence precedence] [tos tos] [log] [time-range time-range-name] [fragments]

7. Repeat Step 5 and/or Step 6 as necessary, adding statements by sequence number where you planned. Use the no sequence-number command to delete an entry.

8. end

9. show ip access-lists access-list-name

Configuration Examples for IP Access List Entry Sequence Numbering

Resequencing Entries in an Access List: Example

The following example shows access list resequencing. The starting value is 1, and increment value is 2. The subsequent entries are ordered based on the increment values that users provide, and the range is from 1 to 2147483647.

When an entry with no sequence number is entered, by default it has a sequence number of 10 more than the last entry in the access list.

Router# show access-list 150


Extended IP access list 150
10 permit ip host 10.3.3.3 host 172.16.5.34
20 permit icmp any any
30 permit tcp any host 10.3.3.3
40 permit ip host 10.4.4.4 any
50 Dynamic test permit ip any any
60 permit ip host 172.16.2.2 host 10.3.3.12
70 permit ip host 10.3.3.3 any log
80 permit tcp host 10.3.3.3 host 10.1.2.2
90 permit ip host 10.3.3.3 any
100 permit ip any any


Router(config)# ip access-list extended 150
Router(config)# ip access-list resequence 150 1 2
Router(config)# end


Router# show access-list 150


Extended IP access list 150
1 permit ip host 10.3.3.3 host 172.16.5.34
3 permit icmp any any
5 permit tcp any host 10.3.3.3
7 permit ip host 10.4.4.4 any
9 Dynamic test permit ip any any
11 permit ip host 172.16.2.2 host 10.3.3.12
13 permit ip host 10.3.3.3 any log
15 permit tcp host 10.3.3.3 host 10.1.2.2
17 permit ip host 10.3.3.3 any
19 permit ip any any

Adding Entries with Sequence Numbers: Example
In the following example, an new entry is added to a specified access list:

Router# show ip access-list


Standard IP access list tryon
2 permit 10.4.4.2, wildcard bits 0.0.255.255
5 permit 10.0.0.44, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
10 permit 10.0.0.1, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
20 permit 10.0.0.2, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255


Router(config)# ip access-list standard tryon


Router(config-std-nacl)# 15 permit 10.5.5.5 0.0.0.255


Router# show ip access-list


Standard IP access list tryon
2 permit 10.4.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.255.255
5 permit 10.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
10 permit 10.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
15 permit 10.5.5.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
20 permit 10.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255

Entry without Sequence Number: Example
The following example shows how an entry with no specified sequence number is added to the end of an access list. When an entry is added without a sequence number, it is automatically given a sequence number that puts it at the end of the access list. Because the default increment is 10, the entry will have a sequence number 10 higher than the last entry in the existing access list.

Router(config)# ip access-list standard 1


Router(config-std-nacl)# permit 1.1.1.1 0.0.0.255
Router(config-std-nacl)# permit 2.2.2.2 0.0.0.255
Router(config-std-nacl)# permit 3.3.3.3 0.0.0.255


Router# show access-list
Standard IP access list 1
10 permit 0.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
20 permit 0.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
30 permit 0.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255


Router(config)# ip access-list standard 1
Router(config-std-nacl)# permit 4.4.4.4 0.0.0.255
Router(config-std-nacl)# end


Router# show access-list


Standard IP access list 1
10 permit 0.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
20 permit 0.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
30 permit 0.0.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
40 permit 0.4.0.0, wildcard bits 0.0.0.255
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